5 Incredible Modern Marvels of Civil Engineering

JOHN LOEFFLER | July 9, 2019

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Spectacular feats of engineering are always impressive, but when it comes to civil engineering marvels, the sheer scale of the feat can be difficult at times to truly comprehend. Some projects are singular, elegant, and record-breaking efforts, as is the case of the Millau Viaduct in Millau, France, the tallest bridge in the world.

Spotlight

Cornell Pump

The story of Cornell starts in 1946 when five people working at Pacific Pump Company decided to head out on their own. Having a complete service department, they became familiar with what most of the common pump failures were. Many motor failures came from pressure spikes during operation, overloading capacity and water related failures of the pump end motor bearings.

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ENGINEERING TECH

ICE asks: what should be in the UK's second National Infrastructure Assessment?

Article | August 2, 2021

With major demographic challenges on the horizon – including the growth and ageing of the population, coupled with the need to adapt to a changing climate – it is essential that we take a long-term approach to infrastructure planning.The National Infrastructure Commission’s (NIC) National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA) aims to do exactly that. Producing the NIA every five years is one of the NIC’s core responsibilities set out in its charter and its first such report, published in 2018, heavily influenced the government’s recent National Infrastructure Strategy.

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COVID-19: The Economic Impact on Construction

Article | August 2, 2021

Publicly panicking a world by stating that this is a pandemic isn’t going to solve the immediate problem the world is facing. We are already hearing China is reporting that its citizens are getting a better handle on containing the virus, which is great news from a human, public health, and economic perspective. Perhaps the biggest lesson, as I have stated in a column in Connected World, is that we need to get our own supply-chain house in order. Case in point: construction is instantly feeling the crunch.

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ENGINEERING TECH

The latest on ICE's second UK infrastructure assessment consultation

Article | August 2, 2021

ICE Policy and Public Affairs recently launched a discussion paper and consultation on what should be in the second National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA). The work progresses the institution’s aims to influence infrastructure policy at a systems level. This autumn, the National Infrastructure Commission (NIC) will publish its baseline assessment of the current state of key infrastructure sectors, along with proposals for the strategic themes and main priorities of the second NIA expected in 2023. Having been closely involved in both the establishment of the NIC in 2013 and the first NIA in 2018, our consultation asks what the core considerations of NIA2 should be – including net-zero, levelling-up and climate resilience – and explores which demand drivers have changed since the first NIA. Through this paper, we’re seeking to shape the wider infrastructure policy debate, consistently and over a number of years, by examining what our long-term infrastructure should look like – and most importantly, ensure it delivers the sustainable future outcomes we need it to. Look out for more updates later this year on ICE’s work in this area.

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Advancements in Automotive Technology to Watch Out For

Article | August 2, 2021

Automotive technology has come a long way since the car was first invented. From electronics that control your LED brake lights to driver override systems, there isn’t much that can’t be done with a vehicle in 2020. Whether you’re a car collector or just a driver, you should know all about the most recent advancements in automotive technology today and what they can do for your vehicle.

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Spotlight

Cornell Pump

The story of Cornell starts in 1946 when five people working at Pacific Pump Company decided to head out on their own. Having a complete service department, they became familiar with what most of the common pump failures were. Many motor failures came from pressure spikes during operation, overloading capacity and water related failures of the pump end motor bearings.

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